Costa crew facing alleged settlement pressure

Financial Times
By Cynthia O’Murchu in London
Crew members who survived the deadly wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise ship in January have felt pressure to accept cash settlements quickly in order to return to their jobs, lawyers advising on possible claims against the ship’s owners have told the Financial Times.Costa Crociere, the Carnival subsidiary that operated the Concordia, and Cruise Ships Catering International, a subsidiary that hired food and beverage workers, have offered crew members a payout for losses that also requires them to forfeit their right to claim psychological and physical distress from the wreck.

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Costa accused of bullying Concordia crew to accept compensation

TravelMole
Crew who survived the Costa Concordia tragedy have been offered cash settlements for the loss of their personal items on board the ship when it sank off the coast of Italy, as long as they waive their right to claim compensation for any physical harm or emotional trauma.According to a report in the Financial Times, the cash offer covers lost money and personal items up to a maximum of $3,750 (£2,383) and pay for the remainder of their contracts.

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Pain of Zeebrugge ferry tragedy lingers with Costa Concordia

The National
A colleague jabbed his finger at a picture of the Costa Concordia cruise ship, surrounded by tugs as it lay helplessly on its side off the Italian coast. “It’s Zeebrugge 25 years on,” he observed quietly. While the death tolls were sharply different, there were similarities between the two scenes a quarter of a century apart. Even the salvage vessels clustered around the Concordia were from the Dutch company Smit – the same company that responded to the car ferry Herald of Free Enterprise, which capsized shortly after setting sail from Zeebrugge, Belgium, for Dover, England, on March 6, 1987.

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Raw video: Helicopters deliver food to Costa Allegra passengers

GlobalNews.ca
Six weeks ago, Allegra’s sister ship, the Costa Concordia, hit a reef and capsized off Italy. Allegra arrived in the Seychelles after three days under tow. There were no injuries. In the raw video footage above, passengers look on as helicopters deliver boxes of food to those on Costa Allegra.

Read it on Global News: Global News | Raw video: Helicopters deliver food to Costa Allegra passengers

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Europeans still think cruises are safe despite tragedy: poll

Yahoo! Philippines News
Most Europeans still think cruises are safe despite the Costa Concordia shipwreck tragedy on January 13 that claimed 32 lives, according to a poll by cruise ship operator MSC published on Tuesday. The poll by the Interactive Institute of 2524 people in France, Germany, Italy and Spain from February 3 to 14 found that 78.5 percent of respondents considered cruises a safe way to travel.

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PORT OF SAVONA-VADO, TROUBLED WATERS IN 2012?

Green Med Journal
Despite an increase in traffic in 2011 (+2.8%, for a total of 14.495 million tons handled), the Northern Italian port is in trouble for container transport and could, in the cruise sector, be affected by the sinking of the Costa Concordia. The Reefer Terminal, the largest cargo terminal in the port, registered a significant reduction in container traffic, from 190,000 TEUs in 2010 to 160,000 TEUs in 2011. In 2012, the decision of the shipping company Hamburg Sud to entrust its cargos to South America to MSC could cause the loss of further several thousand TEUs from Savona in favor of the port of Genoa, from which MSC operates .

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Nexus Consulting Advocates for Cruise Passengers Before the US Senate

PR Web)
The Costa Concordia lost only 32 lives because a few passengers and crew members were able to call loved ones and report distress,” said Doherty in his oral Senate testimony. “We are today calling for legislation to mandate Passenger Distress Systems on cruise vessels, to empower passengers to alert outside rescue authorities if they feel their lives are in danger and are not sure proper distress messages were sent – for whatever reason – by ship’s personnel.”

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Passenger ship safety review

Cruise and Ferry
The European Commission has invited the industry, represented by the European Cruise Council (ECC) and Interferry, to participate in the review, which is already underway but has been accelerated by the recent Costa Concordia accident. Interferry said that the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) had already completed two studies that analyse shortcomings in the current regulatory frameworks. One of the major issues is the reconciliation between SOLAS 2009 and the Stockholm Agreement.

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