Travel Detective Blog: Marine Salvage & the Costa Concordia

Peter Greenberg.com Travel News
The Costa Concordia remains in the headline, but most reports focus on the legal implications. The Travel Detective looks at what’s to come for the actual ship and breaks down the history of marine salvage in the cruise industry. There’s a dark science called marine salvage. If you’re driving your car and it gets totaled, the tow truck comes and you get paid some depreciated amount from your insurance company, the car gets taken to a salvage yard and gets crushed and that’s it–we’re done– the car never gets driven again. That is not necessarily the case in the cruise ship business after a major accident.

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Europeans still think cruises are safe despite Costa Concordia tragedy: poll

Canada.com
The Costa Concordia cruise ship lies on January 15, 2012 in the harbour of the Tuscan island of Giglio after it ran aground and keeled over after hitting underwater rocks on January 13. ROME – Most Europeans still think cruises are safe despite the Costa Concordia shipwreck tragedy on January 13 that claimed 32 lives, according to a poll by cruise ship operator MSC published on Tuesday. The poll by the Interactive Institute of 2,524 people in France, Germany, Italy and Spain from February 3 to 14 found that 78.5 percent of respondents considered cruises a safe way to travel.

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NAVIGATING ROUGH SEAS

U-T San Diego
By AP & BLOOMBERG NEWS Several new incidents involving vessels of Miami-based Carnival Corp., parent of the Italian owner of the Costa Concordia passenger liner that ran aground off Italy in January, are clouding the world’s biggest cruise operator’s recovery as peak booking season enters its final leg. About two weeks ago, 22 passengers from the Carnival Splendor were robbed during a land excursion in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, and two of the company’s British ships were turned away in Argentina after visiting the Falkland Islands, as part of a long-running dispute between the South American country and the United Kingdom.

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Mandatory cruise muster

Maritime Journal
In the wake of the Costa Concordia incident, the global cruise industry has announced a new emergency drill policy requiring mandatory muster for embarking passengers prior to departure from port. The new policy follows the industry’s announcement on January 27 of a Cruise Industry Operational Safety Review in response to the Concordia incident and as part of the industry’s continuous efforts to review and improve safety measures.

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INTERVIEW: CEO: Despite accidents, Costa Crociere to keep cruising

Monsters and Critics.com
A woman waves towards the cruise ship ‘Costa Romantica,’ as it leaves the port of Savona, Itlay on 02 March 2012. EPA/LUCA ZENNARO In a disastrous start to the year, Italian cruise ship operator Costa Crociere suffered not one, but two accidents – one of them with multiple fatalities.But, while the wreck of the Costa Concordia in January, followed by the disabling of the Costa Allegra the following month, might have spelled the end for some companies, Costa Crociere intends to overcome its current crop of problems. In an exclusive interview with dpa, president and chief executive officer (CEO) Pier Luigi Foschi, rejected reports that parent company, US-based Carnival Corporation, may be tempted to scrap the Costa Crociere brand name in the wake of the recent bad publicity.

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Maritime Disaster Conference in NYC Hones Coordination

The Epoch Times
By Yi Yang NEW YORK—Two months after the Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia sunk on January 13, the Richmond University Medical Center (RUMC) hosted the “Maritime Disaster in NYC” trauma symposium. Attendees focused on learning techniques and how to coordinate in the event of a similar disaster in the future at the New York Harbor. Hospital staff from the around the city gathered in the medical’s center’s Sipp Conference Center to attend the lectures intended to provide the audience with the most current data and techniques

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Sink or swim

Muse
The CBC acknowledged that the demand for cruises has dropped 15 to 20 per cent in the weeks after the cruise ship Costa Concordia ran aground off Italy’s coast. A few weeks ago when passengers were enjoying Mexico’s scenery, 22 passengers were robbed by hooded gunmen, and three major liners—Royal Caribbean’s Voyager of the Sea and Princess Cruise lines’ Ruby Princess and Crown Princess—all experienced outbreaks of the Norwalk virus, causing some guests to have a pretty shitty time.

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Poll: Nearly Half of Public Less Likely to Cruise

Meetings & Conventions
by Lisa A. Grimaldi
March 7, 2012 A recent study conducted by soda.com, a web-based opinion site, reveals that 47 percent of 840 respondents are less likely to cruise following the January grounding of the Costa Concordia and February fire aboard the Costa Allegra. In an earlier poll, conducted in the aftermath of the Concordia incident, just 27 percent of those polled were less likely to cruise.

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Carnival’s Target, Estimates Lowered at UBS; Costa Disaster Will Take its Toll

Dividend.com (blog)
Cruise ship operator Carnival Corporation on Wednesday caught some negative commentary from analysts at UBS.The firm maintained its “Buy” rating on CCL but lowered its price target to $34, suggesting a smaller 15% upside to the stock’s Tuesday closing price of $29.48. UBS also lowered its first quarter earnings estimates for the company, citing initial impacts from the recent Costa Concordia shipwreck in Italy.UBS also lowered its first quarter earnings estimates for the company, citing initial impacts from the recent Costa Concordia shipwreck in Italy. Carnival shares rose 44 cents, or +1.5%, in premarket trading Wednesday. Shares of Carnival Corporation

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Celestial movements contributed to Titanic disaster

Herald Sun
Extreme high tides could have dislodged extra icebergs Moon came the closest to Earth in over 1400 years Titanic theme song played as Costa Concordia sank PASSENGERS on the Titanic may have been better off checking their stars before boarding the ill-fated ship’s maiden voyage. Scientists at the Texas State University believe movements of the sun and moon may have altered ocean tides, dislodging icebergs and sending the Titanic to its watery grave, along with 1500 passengers.

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