Salvaging the Costa Concordia: why an engineer’s dream is a daunting task

It was one of the biggest passenger ships to capsize, and it could require a vessel of equally epic proportions to remove the Costa Concordia from the rocky shores off the coast of Tuscany.

The 950 foot-long cruise liner ran into rocks and toppled over in shallow water off the island of Giglio in January 2012, killing 32 passengers. It was raised from its semi-submerged position last month in an ambitious feat of engineering involving a multinational team of 500 specialists.

Now engineers are looking at how to tow the battered, algae-covered cruise ship, which is twice the weight of the Titanic, away from Giglio, part of an archipelago and marine sanctuary.

Salvaging the Costa Concordia: why an engineer’s dream is a daunting task Christian Science Monitor