Italy cruise ship removal plans to start

Ship owner Costa Crociere and Italy’s civil protection agency said in a statement on Wednesday that the July 14 start date would be based on the weather conditions and a final go-ahead from state environmental authorities.

“The salvage team have confirmed that the Concordia refloating operation is set to go ahead starting on Monday, July 14,” the statement said.

It added however that “final confirmation of the start of the refloating operation will not be announced until the day before it actually begins”.

Italy cruise ship removal plans to start MSN NZ

Costa Concordia refloat date set

The last Costa Concordia progress update we gave you was that the ship was all set to be refloated within a couple of weeks, and we can now tell you that the Costa Concordia refloat date looks set to commence on either July the 13th or 14th.

We have been informed that all sponsons are in position and technicians have started to make finally checks ready for the big day. There are 30 sponsons in all on both sides of the ship, which will be slowly emptied once the refloating process begins.
Costa Concordia refloat date set Publication

Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs

The Costa Concordia capsizing is now expected to cost the owners of the imfamous cruise ship more than $2 billion.

“So far, our costs are at 1 billion euros. But that does not include 100 million for the ship to be broken up for scrap and the cost of repairing damage to Giglio island,” Costa Crociere CEO Michael Thamm told the German weekly newspaper Bild am Sonntag.

The disaster hurt the image of Carnival, the world’s largest cruise operator. In March, the company forecast an annual profit below analysts’ estimates as it cut prices and spent more on advertising to attract customers.

The 114-ton luxury liner struck rocks as it sailed close to the island of Giglio off Tuscany in January 2012, killing 32 people and setting off a chaotic evacuation of more than 4,000 passengers and crew

Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs Soundings

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Salvage contractors are set to refloat the stricken cruise ship Costa Concordia within the next two weeks in the latest stage of what has become the most expensive ship recovery operation in history.

London insurers picking up the $2 billion (£1.18 billion) bill will be closely tracking the moves to float the ship.

Insurance sources said the salvage could involve a semi-submersible boat effectively carrying the Costa Concordia to nearby Genoa to be dismantled.

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks Mail Online

Protestors target Concordia

The international protest group says the five-day voyage to the Italian port is a “potential environmental disaster”.

Greenpeace Italy claims the voyage to Genoa is fraught with danger because of the risk that toxic fluids still in the wreck could leak into the marine environment.

“We cannot permit another environmental disaster,” Luca Lacoboni, of Greenpeace Italy told UK newspaper The Daily Mail.

Protestors target Concordia Tradewinds

Costa Concordia to be towed away

Some reports suggest, however, that islanders are concerned that the complex operation to remove the huge wreck will necessitate the closure of Giglio’s ferry service – thus strangling the tourism trade for a week near the peak of the summer season.

The final decision on when to begin the delicate task of towing the wreck will be decided by sea conditions. This week La Repubblica newspaper said that, based on past weather conditions recorded by ISPRA (Institute for Environmental Protection and Research), authorities believed that any day between 13 July and 8 August might be chosen. Figures suggest that on these dates the vessel would be less likely to meet waves higher than 2ft while it is towed to the mainland.

Costa Concordia to be towed away Independent IE