Though He’s Guilty, the Costa Concordia’s Captain Walks Free for Now

Schettino was sentenced to 16 years — 10 for manslaughter, five for causing a maritime disaster, one for abandoning his passengers. As long as his sentence is under appeal, Schettino will not go to prison. He could — in theory — take command of a ship while his sentence is still under appeal. Italian legal cases can take years and even decades to fully unfold.

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Costa Concordia verdict looms

GROSSETO, Italy — Whatever verdict is delivered in the trial of the Italian sea captain for the shipwreck of the Costa Concordia cruise liner and for the deaths of 32 people, survivors and victims’ families already are wondering if justice will be done.The trial, expected to bring a verdict this week, has a sole defendant. Francesco Schettino is accused of causing the shipwreck on the night of Jan. 13, 2012, when he steered too close to a tiny Tuscan island, smashing into a granite reef that sliced open the hull, sending seawater rushing in. Schettino is also charged with multiple manslaughter and injury, and of abandoning the luxury liner when many of the 4,200 passengers and crew were still aboard.

Costa Concordia verdict looms CBS

Prosecutor Alessandro Leopizzi: Captain Is Reason Why 32 Died Aboard Concordia

The 32 victims of the Costa Concordia shipwreck didn’t die because the luxury cruise liner crashed into a reef, but due to “chaos, delays, errors” under the captain’s watch, a prosecutor contended in final arguments Friday.

Francesco Schettino, who captained the Costa Crociere vessel when it capsized in 2012 near tiny Giglio island off the Tuscan coast, is being tried for manslaughter, causing the shipwreck and abandoning the Concordia while many passengers and crew members were still aboard.

Read more: Prosecutor: Captain Is Reason Why 32 Died Aboard Concordia

Concordia shipwreck trial to hear closing arguments

Wednesday testimony claims Schettino was “in shock”

Closing arguments for the prosecution are scheduled Thursday and Friday in the trial of Francesco Schettino, captain of the Costa Concordia which shipwrecked off the Tuscan island of Giglio in January 2012, killing 32 people. In Wednesday’s hearings, Captain Leopoldo Manna, director of central operations for Rome’s harbourmaster, testified that based on his telephone conversations with Schettino while the shipwreck was underway, Manna told operations center personnel he felt Schettino wasn’t the “most suitable” person to speak to regarding the situation, and that he “seemed in shock”. A recording was played in court in which Manna uses a vulgar expression to tell another in the operations center that Schettino seemed stupid or “out of it”.

Concordia shipwreck trial to hear closing arguments

South Korea ferry disaster

South Korea ferry disaster

Comparisons are being drawn between the sinking of the Sewol ferry and the 2012 Costa Concordia disaster.

The causes may be very different and the toll far heavier but Italian media have pointed to similarities between the ferry disaster of the Sewol in South Korea and the Costa Concordia cruise ship crash in 2012.

“A case of Schettino in Korea” has been the recurring headline in Italian newspapers in the past few days, a reference to the Italian liner’s captain, Francesco Schettino, who is now on trial for the accident in which 32 people lost their lives.

With South Korean rescuers reporting 270 people missing and 32 confirmed dead, Italian media have focussed on the role played by the ferry’s captain Lee Joon-Seok, who was arrested on Saturday along with two of his crew.

Here are five similarities between the disasters:
1. Questionable captains authority
2. Delayed evacuation.
3. Difficulty maneuvering on capsized ship
4. Difficult conditions such as low visibility
5. Captains abandoned ship

Read more:South Korea ferry disaster: The Sewol and the Costa Concordia tragedies in comparison

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Salvage contractors are set to refloat the stricken cruise ship Costa Concordia within the next two weeks in the latest stage of what has become the most expensive ship recovery operation in history.

London insurers picking up the $2 billion (£1.18 billion) bill will be closely tracking the moves to float the ship.

Insurance sources said the salvage could involve a semi-submersible boat effectively carrying the Costa Concordia to nearby Genoa to be dismantled.

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks Mail Online

Protestors target Concordia

The international protest group says the five-day voyage to the Italian port is a “potential environmental disaster”.

Greenpeace Italy claims the voyage to Genoa is fraught with danger because of the risk that toxic fluids still in the wreck could leak into the marine environment.

“We cannot permit another environmental disaster,” Luca Lacoboni, of Greenpeace Italy told UK newspaper The Daily Mail.

Protestors target Concordia Tradewinds

Solutions needed to stop sea disasters

Solutions needed to stop sea disasters
The loss of Costa Concordia and more recently the Malaysian ferry disaster have highlighted the difficulty of launching and boarding lifeboats once a vessel has started to list or sink.

In the Costa Concordia’s case, as boats were being lowered ready to be boarded, the list (tilt) of the ship caused a gap between the lifeboats and the ship. Passengers had difficulty crossing this gap. Given that the boats are lowered from a height of about 20ft above the water, even those accustomed to height might find it intimidating.

Solutions needed to stop sea disasters WMN Letters by Mike Baker