Concordia Lighthouse Competition

North of the Giglio Porto village, the site where the Costa Concordia ran up on the rocks, the Concordia Lighthouse Competition is inviting teams of architects, students, engineers, and designers to “redefine a contemporary lighthouse typology.”

Criteria include “aesthetics and originality”, “clarity and comprehensibility”, “sustainability”, and “translation of the metaphorical power of the lighthouse archetype into the architectural design.”

Registration closes on May 17, and submissions are due on May 24. The winner receives 3000 EUR.

http://matterbetter.com/competitions/show/5

Lifeboat, Passenger Safety, on IMO’s MSC Agenda

IMO advises that its Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) is to meet at the Organization’s London headquarters for its 93rd session, from 14 to 23 May 2014, and a preview of main agenda items follows:
The MSC is expected to adopt amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) related to lifeboat safety; continue its action plan of work on passenger ship safety, following the Costa Concordia incident; review the draft mandatory Polar Code and related draft SOLAS amendments; adopt amendments to SOLAS and other treaties to make mandatory the IMO Member State Audit Scheme; adopt a number of other important amendments; and consider items submitted by the sub-committees.

Lifeboat, Passenger Safety, on IMO’s MSC Agenda Publication

The Battle of the Cruise Liners

Cruise liner companies have experienced an unwelcome period in the spotlight, staring with the Costa Concordia disaster that killed 30 passengers and left two missing (presumed dead), followed by a series of cruises suffering a mix of health and/or mechanical issues, culminating in the expedition that got caught in the ice in December last year — although the latter incident was not a large cruise liner.

The Battle of the Cruise Liners Motley Fool

Ships may over-rely on electronics

Cruise operators, like airline pilots, may be relying too heavily on electronics to navigate massive ships, losing the knowledge and ability needed to operate a vessel in the case of a power failure, an expert sea pilot told a federal agency on Wednesday.

Capt. Jorge Viso with the Tampa Bay Pilots testified before the National Transportation Safety Board on the second day of a two-day hearing the agency is holding after several high-profile cruise mishaps, including last year’s fire aboard the Carnival Triumph that left thousands of passengers stranded for days in squalid conditions aboard a powerless ship adrift in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ships may over-rely on electronics Fire Engineering

NTSB Cruise Ship Safety Forum


Cruise Ships: Examining Safety, Operations and Oversight
The National Transportation Safety Board held a public forum on cruise ship safety and oversight on March 25-26 in Washington.

The forum, Cruise Ships: Examining Safety, Operations and Oversight, reviewed the regulatory framework, ship design and fire protection, operations and corporate oversight of cruise ships. It explored some recent high-profile incidents. The forum’s goal was to encourage dialogue among industry stakeholders, regulators, and the general public to better understand cruise ship safety and oversight. Participants included regulators such as the U.S. Coast Guard, vessel owners and operators, researchers and industry groups.

The Cruise Ship Safety Event can be seen here: http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/032614/ntsb_archive_flv.htm

Tuscany to help family of diver Israel Franco Moreno killed on Concordia job

The Tuscany regional government said Tuesday that it is offering financial assistance to the family of a diver who was killed while working on the wreck of the Costa Concordia cruise liner. Israel Franco Moreno, 42, of Spain died Saturday while assisting with the salvage operation of the Costa Concordia, which killed 32 people when it crashed on rocks and sank in January 2012 off the Tuscan coast near Grossetto. Hundreds were injured in the shipwreck and since the disaster, efforts have been made to refloat the stricken liner so it can be towed away for salvage after it was set upright in September. An investigation is continuing but it is believed that Moreno, while trying to attack floatation tanks to the Concordia wreck, cut his leg and bled to death, despite efforts by his diving partner to get him to the surface and waiting paramedics.

Tuscany to help family of diver killed on Concordia job Gazetta del sud
Costa Concordia diver dies while working on wreckage Yachting & Boating World
Costa Concordia Diver Fatally Injured in Underwater Accident Marine Link
COSTA CONCORDIA Diver Dies After Injury Shipping Times
Costa Concordia takes 33rd victim as diver dies during salvage op Digital Journal
Diver killed working on Concordia in Italy ABC
Diver dies during work on Concordia Times of Malta

Cruise-line industry says it’s vastly improved safety since on-the-water disasters

After a bruising couple of years for the global cruise business, ship operators have emerged with a sharper focus on safety and reliability — and on setting travelers’ minds at ease.

Two years after the fatal grounding of the Costa Concordia in Italy, the industry has adopted new rules on emergency drills, ship operations and life jackets, and has introduced a “passenger bill of rights.” And Costa owner Carnival Corp., has announced massive investments in ship upgrades following the disabling fire aboard the Carnival Triumph a year ago.

“I first started cruising in 1965 and certainly I’ve not seen this level of attention and focus on safety,” said Douglas Ward, author of 2014 Berlitz Cruising and Cruise Ships. “I think all the cruise lines are definitely going in the right direction.”

Cruise-line industry says it’s vastly improved safety since on-the-water disasters Keysnet

Since the Concordia shipwreck, safety advances

After a bruising couple of years for the global cruise business, ship operators have emerged with a sharper focus on safety and reliability — and on setting travelers’ minds at ease.

Two years after the fatal grounding of the Costa Concordia in Italy, the industry has adopted new rules on emergency drills, ship operations and life jackets, and has introduced a “passenger bill of rights.” And Costa owner Carnival Corp., has announced massive investments in ship upgrades following the disabling fire aboard the Carnival Triumph a year ago.

“I first started cruising in 1965 and certainly I’ve not seen this level of attention and focus on safety,” said Douglas Ward, author of 2014 Berlitz Cruising and Cruise Ships. “I think all the cruise lines are definitely going in the right direction.”

Some critics say the changes are more talk than action, but cruise companies and longtime observers say the prolonged attention has led to a safer product and a greater willingness to shine a light on sensitive subjects. Everyone agrees, however, that there is more work to be done…

Since the Concordia shipwreck, safety advances Miami Herald
Survivors remember Costa Concordia disaster Stuff
Vigil marks Costa Concordia anniversary News.Com.AU

Maritime disaster awaits unless steps are taken

It is not a wildly risky prediction to say that we have a maritime disaster somewhere in our future.

Cruise ships are getting ever larger and carrying ever larger numbers of passengers, more than could be comfortably or efficiently removed from the ship in the event of a fire or a sinking.

In January 2012, the U.S. Costa Concordia, with 4,252 people aboard, ran aground on a clearly visible island off the coast of Italy, with the loss of 32 lives. Because of delays in implementing safety procedures and language barriers among the crew and passengers, the ship was not abandoned in an orderly fashion, and the captain, rather than stick with his ship as law and tradition demand, left about an hour before most of his passengers.

Maritime disaster awaits unless steps are taken MDJ Online

New York Times questions cruise industry safety procedures

A story in the New York Times yesterday raised disturbing questions about whether cruise ships have gotten too big to be safe.

Although incidents aboard the Costa Concordia, the Carnival Triumph and the Grandeur of the Seas have not resulted in any casualties, they do beg the question of whether megaships can handle emergencies at sea.

The biggest ship on the water, Royal Caribbean’s Allure of the Seas, for example, holds 8,600 passengers and crew, as many people as a small town.

Given the size of today’s ships, any problem immediately becomes a very big problem,” the Times quotes Michael Bruno, dean of the engineering school at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J., and former chairman of the National Research Council’s Marine Board, as saying. “I sometimes worry about the options that are available.”

New York Times questions cruise industry safety procedures Travel Mole