Thieves evade lasers to nab shipwreck’s bell

Toronto Sun
Underwater thieves have evaded an array of laser systems that measure millimetric shifts in the Costa Concordia shipwreck and 24-hour surveillance by the Italian coast guard and police to haul off a symbolic booty – the ship’s bell. The giant cruise liner capsized off the Tuscan island of Giglio after hitting a rock on January 13, killing at least 25 people. Seven people are still unaccounted for.

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* In the interest of brevity, when content appears to be redundant, rather than having separate posts for similar articles, we are just listing them together.

Costa Concordia Disaster: Bell Disappears From Shipwreck Site

Huffington Post
ROME, March 15 – Underwater thieves have evaded an array of laser systems that measure millimetric shifts in the Costa Concordia shipwreck and 24-hour surveillance by the Italian coast guard and police to haul off a symbolic booty – the ship’s bell. Prosecutors have opened an investigation to find out who filched the modern-day Titanic’s bell.

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Travel Detective Blog: Marine Salvage & the Costa Concordia

Peter Greenberg.com Travel News
The Costa Concordia remains in the headline, but most reports focus on the legal implications. The Travel Detective looks at what’s to come for the actual ship and breaks down the history of marine salvage in the cruise industry. There’s a dark science called marine salvage. If you’re driving your car and it gets totaled, the tow truck comes and you get paid some depreciated amount from your insurance company, the car gets taken to a salvage yard and gets crushed and that’s it–we’re done– the car never gets driven again. That is not necessarily the case in the cruise ship business after a major accident.

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