Sewol and Costa Concordia: two sea tragedies strikingly alike

“A case of Schettino in Korea” has been the recurring headline in Italian newspapers in the past few days – a reference to the Italian liner’s captain now on trial for an accident in which 32 people lost their lives.
The same number of people are now confirmed dead in the Sewol tragedy, while 270 people are still missing.

As frustration and despair run high in the South Korean republic, everyone’s attention has focused on the 69 year old captain Lee Joon-Seok, who, witnesses say, chose to flee the tilted ship without a minute-long hesitation. Earlier on Friday he was arrested along with two of his crew members. Here are five similarities between the disasters
Captain in charge
Delayed evacuation
Captain leaves
Capsized ship
Difficult rescue

Sewol and Costa Concordia: two sea tragedies strikingly alike Voice of Russia
Ferry Disaster Compared to Costa Concordia Maritime Executive
Captains Uncourageous: Abandoning Ship Long Seen As A Crime NPR

Cruise Ship Could Ruin Marine Sanctuary

The smallest mistake in refloating the crippled Costa Concordia cruise ship will sink it, creating an environmental disaster. Eighteen months ago the massive Costa Concordia cruise liner crashed onto the tiny island of Giglio, 12 miles off Italy’s western coast. Within minutes the 950-foot vessel tipped sideways, tossing passengers into the sea. In the end, 32 people died and 64 were seriously injured.

Refloating the Wrecked Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Could Ruin Marine Sanctuary Consortium for Ocean Leadership
“Hot Tapping” The Costa Concordia

Report into boat accident says ship was in poor condition –

A REPORT into the sinking of tourist boat – ‘the Vixen’ – last September has said the tourist boat that sank on Loch Lomond causing five passengers to jump into the water was in “poor condition”.
The report follows an inquiry from the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (Maib) which found a series of failings in the condition of the boat and its operation.

Report into boat accident says ship was in poor condition Dumbarton and Vale of Leven Reporter

Coast guard: Oil slicks likely from shipwreck

A sunken ship is believed to be the source of small oil slicks that have been recently spotted near a group of islands off northeastern Newfoundland, the Canadian Coast Guard said Tuesday. Spokesman Robert Grant said sonar images and photos taken by a remotely operated submersible vehicle confirm oil is coming from the cracked hull of the Manolis

a href=”http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1126185-coast-guard-oil-slicks-likely-from-shipwreck” target=”_blank”> Coast guard: Oil slicks likely from shipwreck Herald News