Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs

The Costa Concordia capsizing is now expected to cost the owners of the imfamous cruise ship more than $2 billion.

“So far, our costs are at 1 billion euros. But that does not include 100 million for the ship to be broken up for scrap and the cost of repairing damage to Giglio island,” Costa Crociere CEO Michael Thamm told the German weekly newspaper Bild am Sonntag.

The disaster hurt the image of Carnival, the world’s largest cruise operator. In March, the company forecast an annual profit below analysts’ estimates as it cut prices and spent more on advertising to attract customers.

The 114-ton luxury liner struck rocks as it sailed close to the island of Giglio off Tuscany in January 2012, killing 32 people and setting off a chaotic evacuation of more than 4,000 passengers and crew

Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs Soundings

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks

Salvage contractors are set to refloat the stricken cruise ship Costa Concordia within the next two weeks in the latest stage of what has become the most expensive ship recovery operation in history.

London insurers picking up the $2 billion (£1.18 billion) bill will be closely tracking the moves to float the ship.

Insurance sources said the salvage could involve a semi-submersible boat effectively carrying the Costa Concordia to nearby Genoa to be dismantled.

Insurers’ £1.2bn bill for Costa Concordia: Salvage contractors set to refloat stricken cruise ship in next two weeks Mail Online

Shipwreck off Italy must be removed soon

An Italian official is pressing for the speedy removal of the shipwrecked cruise liner, the Costa Concordia, warning that the hulk may break up in winter storms.

Franco Gabrielli, head of the removal efforts, told residents of the tiny Mediterranean island of Giglio on Monday that the ship must be towed by September at the latest. Gabrielli says another winter’s worth of storms may damage the ship to such an extent that towing won’t be possible.

He pressed various national, regional and local authorities to move forward on plans.

Shipwreck off Italy must be removed soon mail.com

‘What have I done?’ Costa Concordia captain’s horror when cruise liner hit rocks

Capt Francesco Schettino exclaimed “Madonna, what have I done?” when the Costa Concordia smashed into rocks off the Italian island off Giglio, a court heard today.

“Did we hit a reef?” the commander of the 950ft-long cruise liner asked his fellow officers, according to an audio recording played in court in Grosseto, Tuscany, where he is on trial for abandoning ship, causing a shipwreck and multiple counts of manslaughter.

The Concordia, which in weight is more than twice the size of the Titanic, rammed into a rocky shoal just a few yards from the coast of Giglio on the night of Jan 13, 2012. In the ensuing evacuation, 32 people lost their lives, including a five-year-old girl.
The trial, which is being held in a municipal theatre to accommodate the large number of witnesses, technical experts and survivors expected to attend, heard evidence from Salvatore Ursino, one of the ship’s junior officers.

‘What have I done?’ Costa Concordia captain’s horror when cruise liner hit rocks

Salvage chief warns Costa Concordia could fracture

The man in charge of salvaging the wreck of the Costa Concordia which crashed off the coast of Tuscany last year has warned the massive luxury cruise ship could fracture when it is rotated in early September. Nick Sloane, the 52-year-old engineer who heads the world’s most biggest-ever marine salvage operation, is awaiting final approval from Italian authorities to rotate the ship in the first week of September.”When we raise it you will hear the noise from the wrenching and of the fracture of internal sections but we hope that the external structure remains intact,” Mr Sloane said. A team of 450 technicians, including 70 Britons, have been working around the clock for more than a year to stabilise and salvage the ship that crashed into rocks off the coast of Giglio on January 13 2012.

Salvage chief warns Costa Concordia could fracture

Costa Concordia Captain Francesco Schettino facing criminal trial

It took a long while to determine but at last there has been a decision on whether to send Costa Concordia Captain Francesco Schettino to trial. A judge in Grosetto, Italy ruled this week that prosecutors can go ahead with the charges. Schettino was the captain of the ship on the Jan. 13, 2012 when it hit a reef and ran aground some 300 metres from the Italian island of Giglio in the Tuscan Bay. There were more than 4,200 passengers and crew onboard the 114,500 tonnes ship, of which 32 died when the ship listed over. Sixty-five percent of the cruise liner is underwater still.

Costa Concordia Captain Francesco Schettino facing criminal trial Digital Journal
Costa Concordia Shipwreck Like You’ve Never Seen … gCaptain

Costa Concordia captain back in court

The captain of the wrecked Costa Concordia ship, Francesco Schettino, enters an Italian court for a pre-trial hearing. The court will decide who should stand trial and under which charges for the Costa Concordia crash, which killed 32 people in January 2012. The hearing is taking place in a theatre in the centre of the Tuscan town of Grosseto to allow a large number of people to attend the proceedings if warranted. Prosecutors are seeking to have Schettino tried on charges including manslaughter, causing a shipwreck and abandoning ship. They also want to send five other Concordia officers to trial over the accident. The lawyer representing Francesco Schettino said the captain was feeling depressed. He is a man like everybody else, he is only human, he said. His legal team is set to request a simulation of the wreck using a twin ship or if that’s not possible, a computer simulation. But any additional tests or simulations would further prolong the start of the trial …

Costa Concordia captain back in court
“Company goes free” critique on Costa could be levelled at superyacht sector”

10 things your cruise line won’t tell you Navigating a sea of potential sickness, danger and debt

Edison at WSJ. 1. “Our ships might sink, but we won’t.“

It’s been a tough couple of seasons for the cruise ship industry. First, the Costa Concordia, a 3,800-passenger ship operated by a unit of Carnival Corp., ran aground off the coast of Italy in January 2012. Thirty-two people were killed, while images of the abandoned ship, lying incongruously on its side. beside a picturesque beach town, flashed around the world.

10 things cruise lines won’t tell you Market Watch
Costa Concordia You tube

Work on refloating Costa Concordia ongoing as giant box attached

Italian and American companies, Micoperi and Titan Salvage, continue working on refloating the Costa Concordia. Last week the first of 30 giant ‘boxes’ was attached to a side of the doomed cruise ship. There will be 15 of these hollow boxes on either side of the Costa Concordia. Once all 30 are in place a series of cables and pulleys will lift the boat upwards and set it in a floating position, with the hollow boxes enabling it to occur.

Work on refloating Costa Concordia ongoing as giant box attached Digital Journal

Costa Concordia Refloating

Italian and American companies, Micoperi and Titan Salvage, continue working on refloating the Costa Concordia. Last week the first of 30 giant ‘boxes’ was attached to a side of the doomed cruise ship. There will be 15 of these hollow boxes on either side of the Costa Concordia. Once all 30 are in place a series of cables and pulleys will lift the boat upwards and set it in a floating position, with the hollow boxes enabling it to occur.

Work on refloating Costa Concordia ongoing as giant box attached Digital Journal