Passenger Hurt in New York Seastreak Crash to Get $5M

Passenger Hurt in New York Seastreak Crash to Get $5M
Three passengers injured when a commuter ferry crashed into a lower Manhattan pier in 2013 have recently settled lawsuits for a total of nearly $6 million, including $5 million for a passenger who suffered brain injuries.

The settlements were signed by U.S. Magistrate Mark Falk this month in the ongoing litigation against Seastreak LLC, owner of the vessel.

More than 80 people were injured on Jan. 9, 2013 when the Wall Street-bound Seastreak crashed into a dock near the South Street Seaport, sending people tumbling down stairs and into walls.

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Italian officials sue Costa Concordia owner for $275 million

Costa Cruises, a unit of Carnival Corp., was hit with huge lawsuits by officials from Tuscany and the island of Giglio, who allege that the January 2012 disaster contributed to a major decline in area visitors.
Italian officials are suing the owner of the doomed Costa Concordia cruise ship for an eye-watering $275 million — over claims the liner disaster destroyed local tourism.

Costa Cruises, a unit of Carnival Corp., was hit with the mega-lawsuits by officials from Tuscany and the island of Giglio on Monday, according to reports.

They allege that the January 2012 disaster contributed to a major decline in visitors to the area, which they say will take “years” of investment to rectify.
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Victim’s body found from sunken South Korean ferry

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The first body found in three months was being recovered Tuesday from the sunken South Korean ferry, increasing the official death toll to 295, officials said.

The government task force said in a statement the body was found around a women’s toilet in the ship. The badly decayed body was being pulled up to the surface and DNA tests were planned to identify the victim, according to task force officials.

Victim’s body found from sunken South Korean ferry

Wireless Technology Can Dramatically Improve Ship Safety

The sinking of the Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia in 2012 – and the reported difficulties in evacuating over 4,000 people with the eventual loss of 32 lives –underlined the urgent need to accurately trace passengers during emergencies.

Indeed, while most people on board were brought ashore during a six-hour evacuation, the search for missing passengers and crew continued for several months.
Wireless Technology Can Dramatically Improve Ship Safety Product Design and Development

COSTA CONCORDIA Underway On Her Final Voyage

The final stages of the largest marine salvage project in history came a step closer to completion Wednesday, July 23, 2014, as the COSTA CONCORDIA began to move away from the island of Giglio on a one-way voyage to Genoa, Italy for dismantling. The ocean-going tug BLIZZARD took the lead position in the tow off the wrecked cruise ship’s starboard bow, accompanied by the tug RESOLVE EARL on her port side. Altogether 14 vessels of varying descriptions will accompany the convoy at a speed of no more than 2.5 knots across the open water.

COSTA CONCORDIA Underway On Her Final Voyage Publication

The Titan-Micoperi salvage team has successfully completed the first stage of its operation to refloat Costa Cruises’ Costa Concordia off the coast of Giglio Island, Italy.

The Titan-Micoperi salvage team has successfully completed the first stage of its operation to refloat Costa Cruises’ Costa Concordia off the coast of Giglio Island, Italy.

Engineers started the operation to refloat the ship on 14 July after Nick Sloane, the senior salvage master, and the rest of his team arrived at the Remote Operations Center, which is located on Concordia. Work to remove the final 1,000 tonnes of weight began at 8.30am.

Concordia has now been partially refloated and her bow and stern are about 2.2m above the underwater platform she has been resting on since the parbuckling project started in September 2016.

The Titan-Micoperi salvage team has successfully completed the first stage of its operation to refloat Costa Cruises’ Costa Concordia off the coast of Giglio Island, Italy. Cruise and Ferry

Italy cruise ship removal plans to start

Ship owner Costa Crociere and Italy’s civil protection agency said in a statement on Wednesday that the July 14 start date would be based on the weather conditions and a final go-ahead from state environmental authorities.

“The salvage team have confirmed that the Concordia refloating operation is set to go ahead starting on Monday, July 14,” the statement said.

It added however that “final confirmation of the start of the refloating operation will not be announced until the day before it actually begins”.

Italy cruise ship removal plans to start MSN NZ

Costa Concordia refloat date set

The last Costa Concordia progress update we gave you was that the ship was all set to be refloated within a couple of weeks, and we can now tell you that the Costa Concordia refloat date looks set to commence on either July the 13th or 14th.

We have been informed that all sponsons are in position and technicians have started to make finally checks ready for the big day. There are 30 sponsons in all on both sides of the ship, which will be slowly emptied once the refloating process begins.
Costa Concordia refloat date set Publication

Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs

The Costa Concordia capsizing is now expected to cost the owners of the imfamous cruise ship more than $2 billion.

“So far, our costs are at 1 billion euros. But that does not include 100 million for the ship to be broken up for scrap and the cost of repairing damage to Giglio island,” Costa Crociere CEO Michael Thamm told the German weekly newspaper Bild am Sonntag.

The disaster hurt the image of Carnival, the world’s largest cruise operator. In March, the company forecast an annual profit below analysts’ estimates as it cut prices and spent more on advertising to attract customers.

The 114-ton luxury liner struck rocks as it sailed close to the island of Giglio off Tuscany in January 2012, killing 32 people and setting off a chaotic evacuation of more than 4,000 passengers and crew

Costa Concordia owner faces $2 billion in costs Soundings