Costa Concordia to be Piggy-backed Away

Dockwise, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Royal Boskalis Westminster N.V. (Boskalis) has been awarded the contract to load and transport the lifted ‘Costa Concordia’ wreck from Isola del Giglio onboard the ‘Dockwise Vanguard’. The contract was awarded by Costa Crociere S.p.A. In a unique operation the Costa Concordia can be loaded as a whole onto the Dockwise Vanguard and safely transported to a location where she can be scrapped. The client has yet to make a decision in agreement with the local authorities on the final destination. Alternatives under review include scrapping the vessel in Italy.As part of the contract, certain modifications will be made to the Dockwise Vanguard to accommodate the loading of the Concordia in her current state. The operation is planned to take place around mid-2014 and contract value of the work scope as described amounts to approximately USD 30 million.

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Cruise industry rides the storm of bad press

Bad press over the Costa Concordia disaster, outbreaks of norovirus, onboard fires and other cruise-related incidents have not deterred British holidaymakers, according to Amadeus. The travel technology provider has produced a report on the cruise market based on the results of a Yougov survey of 2,000 people in May.

Cruise industry rides the storm of bad press Travel Mole

Rough seas in Europe for cruise operators

TravelMole
The sinking of the Costa Concordia in January 2012 sparked a turbulent year for the cruise industry in Europe, writes Michelle Grant, travel and tourism analyst at Euromonitor International. “The sinking of Concordia in January 2012 impacted the entire…

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Royal Caribbean swings to loss

MSN Money
Royal Caribbean (RCL) swung to a loss in its second quarter, hurt by the economic turmoil in Europe and a broad industry downturn after the Costa Concordia disaster in January. The cruise line company reported a loss of $3.6 million, or 2 cents per share. “The steady drumbeat of negative news emanating out of Europe is certainly having an impact,” CEO Richard Fain said in a statement. “As a result, we are seeing pluses and minuses in the different geographical markets — North America is holding up reasonably well; Asia is a big plus; but Europe is a pretty consistent minus.
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Protests against huge cruise liner

TravelMole
Since the wreck of the Costa Concordia in January, environmentalists have stepped up their efforts to have large cruise ships banned from the lagoon which surrounds the historic centre of the canal city. Big cruise ships enter the city to drop off passengers conveniently close to the historic centre and the Grand Canal.
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Viking Ventures: Safety policies should be adopted into the cruise ship industry

my.hsj.org
This editorial is about the wake of the deadly Costa Concordia cruise ship accident off the coast of Italy in January 2012. The cruise industry is now proposing implementing new safety standards. Cruise Lines International Association, the world’s largest cruise non-profit organization representing 26 companies, announced Tuesday it is putting in place standards to “achieve concrete, practical and significant safety dividends in the shortest possible time.” It says, among other new policies, that all cruise ships must now have a muster emergency drill before the ship leaves port. Not a day or two after it sails
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Tragedy of Costa Concordia leads to new cruise ship regulations

DigitalJournal.com
The sinking of the Italian cruise ship, the Costa Concordia, has lead to new regulations being adopted jointly by two major cruise ship associations. The European Cruise Council and the Cruise Lines International Assoc. passed three new safety rules.

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